A list of all Undergraduate courses in Classical Languages.

Prerequisite Grade

Any course listed in this department with a prerequisite assumes a grade of C– or better in the prerequisite course. 

Courses

Classical Languages

 Lower Division

1Etymology: The Greek and Latin Roots in English (.25)

A course in vocabulary-building and word-power. Students learn how to decode a wide range of complicated English vocabulary, to make better and more precise vocabulary choices, and to improve oral and written communication skills. Over 60 percent of all English words have Greek or Latin roots. In the sciences and technology, the figure rises to over 90 percent. This course surveys Greek and Latin derivatives in English and examines the contexts in which the original meanings have changed. Students learn to interpret correctly the semantic range of Greek and Latin roots in English. The English language emerges as a dynamic system intricately linked to historical, social, and cultural realities.

 Upper Division

100 Classical Mythology

Introductory course. Study of the highly flexible narrative content of Greek and Roman myths, the underlying thought patterns behind it, and the ancient attitudes to myth in our main sources, the literary works of Greek and Roman writers. Classical myths and mythological references in both Classical and non-Classical literature and art emerge in historical contexts.

 


GREEK 

Lower Division

1 Elementary Greek
Beginner’s course. Morphology, syntax, introduction to the reflective and scientific analysis of language. (Cross-listed as Integral 51.)

2 Elementary Greek
Continuation of Greek 1. Reading of texts of Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisite: Greek 1. (Cross-listed as Integral 52.)

3 Intermediate Greek
Reading of selected authors, study of various types of discourse. Reading of Plato, Aristotle, lyric poetry, and drama. Discussion of logic, rhetoric, and dialectic. Prerequisite: Greek 2. (Cross-listed as Integral 53.)

4 Intermediate Greek
Continuation of Greek 3. Prerequisite: Greek 3. (Cross-listed as Integral 54.) 

Upper Division

Greek 3 and 4 or an acceptable equivalent are prerequisite to all upper division courses, except for Greek 163 and 166.

101 Plato
A reading of a shorter and of a longer dialogue with consideration of the contemporary background, and the range of philological and philosophical questions. A number of the dialogues which are lesser-known are read and considered in translation. An attempt is made to view the totality of Plato’s work and life.

102 Homer
A study of epic dialect and technique of composition; methods of historical and literary interpretation. The nature of myth and a comparison of the diverse forms of ancient epic in various cultures are topics.

103 Greek Historians
The history of Greek historiography is studied by examples of the methods of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon and Polybius from their texts.

105 Greek Orators
Why Rhetoric was the major science of Antiquity is investigated. Examples are taken from the canon of Attic orators.

106 Greek Dramatists
Greek playwrights are studied in as broad a representation as possible: the tragedians, Aristophanes and Menander.

107 Aristotle
A study of Aristotle’s scientific method and its relationship to metaphysics as exemplified in the Physics and Metaphysics, as well as of his concept of dialectic as opposed to that of Plato.

110 New Testament Greek
A sampling of Hellenistic Greek is studied as background, and the course then concentrates upon the Gospels and Paul in selection.

115 Greek Lyric Poets
Special attention is accorded Pindar. The history of Greek lyric is studied in examples.

160 Greek Literature in Translation
Texts of epic, dramatic, lyric, and historical and philosophical genres are presented and discussed, and their relationships to modern literature considered.

163 Greek History and Civilization
A study of the religious, social, political, and economic conditions of Ancient Greece (2000-250 B.C.) through history and archaeology. Selected ancient authors are read in their historical context. The course is the first half of a study of ancient history. Offered in alternate years. (Cross-listed as History 181.)

166 Classical Archaeology
A study of the topography and monuments of Greece and Rome. Methods of archeological research.

199 Special Study - Honors 
An independent study or research course for upper division majors with a B average in Greek. Permission of the instructor and department chairperson is required. Course normally requires Greek composition. On an individual basis, students work with composition textbooks in order to submit for revision their own renderings into Classical Greek. 

LATIN

Lower Division

1 Elementary Latin
Beginner’s course. Morphology, syntax, exercises in composition and translation.

2 Elementary Latin
Continuation of Latin 1. Prerequisite: Latin 1.

3 Intermediate Latin
Reading of prose. Deepened study of language. Prerequisite: Latin 2.

4 Intermediate Latin
Reading of poetry. Prerequisite: Latin 3.

Upper Division

Latin 3 and 4 or an acceptable equivalent are prerequisite to all upper division courses, except for Latin 163.

101 Cicero
The full variety of Cicero’s texts is sampled, and he is located within the history of the Republic.

102 Roman Historians
A study of representative texts of Sallust, Livy and Tacitus, with attention to the widest range of interpretative problems.

103 Patristic Latin
Texts of Tertullian, Augustine and Boethius are read, with special attention to the Confessions.

104 Roman Comedy
A study of the plays of Plautus and Terence, with attention to contemporary social history and the traditions of the stage.

108 Horace
A study of Horace’s major lyrics, with admission of various methods of interpretation for discussion.

109 Roman Law
The nature and history of Roman law is studied in translation. Its theoretical and historical relation to Common Law is examined.

110 Virgil
The entire corpus of Virgil’s writing is sampled. Philosophical and literary problems are examined.

161 Latin Literature in Translation
Texts of all genres are considered. Historical background and mythological tradition are presented as well as connections to modernity.

163 Roman History and Civilization
A study of pre-Roman Italy and the growth of Rome into a worldwide empire (1000 B.C.-450 A.D.) through history and archaeology. Selected ancient authors are read in their historical context. The course is the second half of a study of ancient history. Offered in alternate years. (Cross-listed as History 182.)

199 Honors-Special Study
An independent study or research course for upper division majors with a B average in Latin. Permission of instructor and department chairperson is required.

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