Creative Writing Reading Series with Susan Griffin

Date & Time: 
Wed, 04/17/2013 - 19:00

SUSAN GRIFFIN'S most recent work is an anthology she co-edited, Transforming Terror: Remember the Soul of the World. Among her 19 books, A Chorus of Stones, the Private Life of War was a New York Times Notable Book, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and won the Northern California Book Award. Celebrated for her elegant prose as well as her innovations in literary form, she has been the recipient of an NEA Grant, a MacArthur Grant for Peace and International Cooperation, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Creative Writing Reading Series with Lou Berney

Date & Time: 
Wed, 03/20/2013 - 19:00

Lou BerneyLOU BERNEY is the author of the novels Gutshot Straight and Whiplash River. His short fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Ploughshares, The New England Review, the Pushcart Prize Anthology and elsewhere.

Writers & Words: videos from past MFA Program events

The Creative Writing Reading Series and Afternoon Craft Conversations bring the literary world's most exciting writers to campus. Now you can hear them to read their work and discuss their craft online at Writers & Words.

 

Watch videos from last semester's Afternoon Craft Conversation and Readings from Shane Book, Wesley Gibson, Judith Claire Mitchell, and Tina Parsons.

 

Here's a sample!

 

MFA Program Professor Lysley Tenorio's Book Tour

Lysley Tenorio's book-tour for story collection, /Monstress/

“MONSTRESS announces the debut of an electric literary talent.

Brilliantly quirky, often moving, always gorgeously told,
these are tales of bighearted misfits who yearn for their authentic selves
with extraordinary passion and grace.”

–CHANG-RAE LEE
New York Times Bestselling Author of The Surrendered

Afternoon Craft Conversations

Click this link to view all readings and craft conversations

SPRING 2014 AFTERNOON CRAFT CONVERSATIONS

(All craft talks are in Hagerty Lounge from 2:35-3:35)

Joshua Mohr






Wednesday, February 19, 2:35pm, Hagerty Lounge

"Plarachterization: The Intersection of Plot and Character" by Joshua Mohr

The best plots aren’t controlled by an authorial presence. Plot springs from the characters themselves. The writer masterminds all of these things, but the more we program ourselves to think of it in this way—that our protagonists are sovereign beings with independent consciousnesses from our own—the better prepared we are to traverse what I’m calling “plarachterization.” This seminar will be geared around characters’ decision making, the causality between plot points, how to keep a reader excitedly flipping pages. We’ll also delve into specific tactics for constructing a present action and how to fold backstory into it.  Plarachterization is a strategy that will help any aspiring writer!

JOSHUA MOHR is the author of four novels, including Damascus, which The New York Times called “Beat-poet cool.”  He’s also written Some Things that Meant the World to Me, one of O Magazine’s Top 10 reads of 2009 and a San Francisco Chronicle best-seller, as well as Termite Parade, an Editors’ Choice on The New York Times Best Seller List.  He lives in San Francisco and teaches in the MFA program at USF. His latest novel Fight Song was published in February 2013.



Norma Cole






Wednesday, March 12, 2:35pm, Hagerty Lounge

"Distraction and Poetry" by Norma Cole

After I decide to play with the fact of doing an interview, as in “make something up,” I am faced with the notion of  “making up” a piece of work to base the interview on. I did, and it’s called “Distraction.” I then begin to think about that wonderful essay by Robert Creeley, “Was That a Real Poem or Did You Just Make It Up Yourself?” So—is there any distinction between “just making something up” and writing “a real poem?”

NORMA COLE is a poet, painter and translator. Win These Posters and Other Unrelated Prizes Inside is her most recent book of poetry. Other books of poetry include Natural Light, Where Shadows Will: Selected Poems 1988—2008 and Spinoza in Her Youth.

 


Kaya Oakes








Wednesday, April 9, 2:35pm, Hagerty Lounge

"From Journalism to Creative Nonfiction" by Kaya Oakes

As an emerging genre, creative nonfiction doesn't have a lot of rules. But it does have roots in journalism, and in the personal essay, stretching back to Montaigne. What are the boundaries between journalism and creative writing, and where can we bend them, and in some cases, break them? How much does the "I" narrator matter when we merge creative techniques with journalistic ones? How much can we borrow techniques from anthropology, archeology, and even philosophy, to create what Jeff Sharlett calls "mutant journalism?" And are creative nonfiction writers really just fancy journalists in the end? 

KAYA OAKES' third book, a hybrid memoir/ethnography/theological rant, Radical Reinvention, was published by Counterpoint Press in 2012. Her previous nonfiction book, Slanted and Enchanted: The Evolution of Indie Culture, was published by Henry Holt in 2009 and was selected as a San Francisco Chronicle notable book. She’s also the author of a collection of poetry, Telegraph, which received the Transcontinental Poetry Prize from Pavement Saw Press.

Creative Writing Reading Series

FALL 2011

YIYUN LI WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 7:30 P.M., SODA CENTER

Yiyun Li grew up in Beijing and came to the United States in 1996. Her fiction has been published in The New Yorker and Best American Short Stories, among others.    Her debut collection, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, won the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the California Book Award for first fiction. Li’s novel, The Vagrants, also won the California Book Award’s gold medal for fiction. Her latest book, Gold Boy, Emerald Girl is a collection of short stories. Li has received fellowships from Lannan Foundation and Whiting Foundation, and MacArthur Foundation named her a 2010 Fellow. She is a contributing editor for the Brooklyn-based literary magazine, A Public Space and teaches at University of California, Davis.

RYAN VAN METER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 7:30 P.M., SODA CENTER

Ryan Van Meter’s essay collection If You Knew Then What I Know Now was published in 2011 by Sarabande Books. His essays have appeared in The Gettysburg Review, Indiana Review, Gulf Coast and Arts & Letters, and have been selected for anthologies including Best American Essays 2009 and Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction. He is an assistant editor at Fourth Genre magazine and currently teaches creative writing at The University of San Francisco.

CLAYTON ESHLEMAN THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 7:30 P.M., SODA CENTER
CO-SPONSORED BY THE MFA PROGRAM AND THE MODERN LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT


Clayton Eshleman’s publications include Jupiter Fuse: Upper Paleolithic Imagination & the Construction of the Underworld; The Complete Poetry of Cesar Vallejo; and The Grindstone of Rapport/ A Clayton Eshleman Reader. He recently published co-translation of Aime Cesaire’s Solar Throat Slashed and Bei Dao’s Endure, and a translation of Bernard Bador’s Curdled Skulls. He has received the National Book Award in Translation, a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, and multiple grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He founded and edited the two seminal poetry magazines, Caterpillar and Sulfer. He is Professor Emeritus at Eastern Michigan University and lives in Ypsilanti.


ALL READINGS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

For More information on The Creative Writing Reading Series please contact Administrative Assistant Sara Mumolo, (925)631-8556 or sm13@stmarys-ca.edu.
Join our Mailing List to receive updates and invitations to events.
Join Our Mailing List
Email:

 

 

For Email Marketing you can trust.

Pages

Maps & Directories

Mailing Address

Saint Mary's College of California
1928 Saint Mary's Road
Moraga, CA 94575
(925) 631-4000
Google Map | Campus Map | PO Boxes