44 Days: Black Mental Health Series

Date & Time:
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 6 p.m.
Location:
Online
Description: 

Black Mental Health Series

Dr. Jacquelyn Johnson | Hosting: Black People Don’t Do That! The messaging and myths that harm us.

 Dr. Jacquelyn Johnson is a licensed psychologist and coach for high-performing Black women. Her formal education includes a BS from Grambling State, a MS in Marriage and Family Therapy from Fuller Theological Seminary, and a second master’s degree and doctorate in psychology from the University of La Verne. Her research has focused on ways in which Black women often shift, altering aspects of their identity based on the contexts in which they sit at any given time. 

Dr. J is a southern California native, Los Angeles to be exact (and yes, native Los Angelenos do exist!). She enjoys getting lost in a good book or being transported to a happy place with music that speaks to her soul. 
Series Description: We are a strong people. We are a resilient people. And we are a people who sometimes choose to remain in pain rather than acknowledge our vulnerabilities. Seeking help is often seen as a sign of weakness, and we get the message that it is not okay to not be okay. Learn three common myths that are keeping us stuck, and what to do about it.

Date & Time: Tuesday, Feb 16th, 2021 at 6:00 pm Registration Link

 

Dr. Tameka Jackson | Hosting: Rest & Restore: The Path to Soul Care 

Dr. Tameka Jackson is a licensed psychologist who maintains a private practice in Sacramento. Dr. Jackson has been in private practice for 8 years and has over 15 years’ experience in the mental health field.   Within her practice, she provides individual and couples therapy to adolescent and adult clients. Dr. Jackson also works part-time as a therapist at Folsom Lake College. Recognizing the need for greater attention to the mental health needs of the Black community specifically, Dr. Jackson remains active in lending her time accordingly. In this vein, she is a volunteer for Safe Black Space, a local nonprofit in Sacramento that provides monthly racial healing circles. Additionally, she is trained as an Emotional Emancipation Circle (EEC) facilitator. Most recently, Dr. Jackson founded CORE Love, a wellness-based program for Black women. CORE Love features workshops and support groups that promote radical self-love, self-compassion, and authentic living. Outside of her professional life, Dr. Jackson is happily married and is the mother of a beautiful 8-year-old daughter. She maintains grounding through prayer, meditation, practicing gratitude, and spending time in nature.
Series Description: Now more than ever, the need for Black people to integrate radical self-care practices into our lives is essential for thriving. The ongoing impacts of racism and the global pandemic have been gravely debilitating to our communities, and have also caused wear on our individual spirits. Yet and still, we can find strength through our inner well of resilience. In order to do so, we must take sacred pause to rest and engage in practices that allow for restoration of the soul. This workshop will allow you to engage in self-reflection around your relationship to self-care and share ideas for continued nurturance moving forward. We will use experiential exercises that help us to rest, re-center and restore our souls. The hope is that your spirit will find respite in a culturally affirming holding space.

Date & Time: March 2nd, 2021 at 7:00 pm Registration Link

 

Dr. Carnetta Porter | Hosting: "Why you talk White?": Examining the cultural stress of Blackness and language at PWIs

 Dr. Carnetta Porter earned her Masters of Art and Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from CSPP/Alliant International University, and her Bachelors of Arts in Sociology/Law &   Society from the University of California, Davis. Her doctoral research focused on the relationships between language acquisition, acculturation, racial identity development,   and its impact on mental health for Black/African Americans. Dr. Porter completed her postdoctoral fellowship within a multicultural training program at UCSF/SFGH, Child and Adolescent Services with specialized training focused on supporting vulnerable populations exposed to intergenerational and traumatic life experiences. As a Black identified female, she has achieved over 30 years of professional work focused on operating through a bi-cultural lens within diverse academic, medical and community settings serving high to low functioning, marginalized populations as a clinician and adjunct faculty.  Dr. Porter’s patient aim helps to strengthen and empower clients while providing supportive, client-driven empathy and validation.  She skillfully guides clients distressed with chronic and acute life stressors toward effective coping strategies using psychoeducation and therapeutic interventions within a framework of cultural-sensitivity and integrity.  She lives in Oakland, CA with her husband and 2 teen-aged sons, loves all outdoor activities, karaoke, dancing, cooking, and watching sports, particularly the National Basketball Association. She currently practices as a registered psychologist in San Leandro, CA, and is a staff therapist in Counseling and Psychological Services at St. Mary’s College in Moraga, CA.

Series Description: The navigation of white academic and professional spaces as a Black scholar and professional can feel like a lonely adventure as a racial minority within predominantly White institutions. Language has long been used as a measurement of general intelligence or higher-order thinking, with the acquisition and expression of Standard American English as an essential skill required to achieve academic success and socioeconomic advancement in dominant culture.  African American Vernacular English, or Black English, is a unique cultural marker for Black folks who speak Black vernacular The navigation of white academic and professional spaces as a Black scholar and professional can feel like a lonely adventure as a racial minority within predominantly White institutions. Language has long been used as a measurement of general intelligence or higher-order thinking, with the acquisition and expression of Standard American English as an essential skill required to achieve academic success and socioeconomic advancement in dominant culture.  African American Vernacular English, or Black English, is a unique cultural marker for Black folks who speak Black vernacular. 

Date & Time: Tuesday, March 9th, 2021 at 6:00 pm Registration Link

 

 

Additional Dates & Times: 
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 6 p.m.
Tuesday, March 2, 2021 - 7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 - 6 p.m.
image of the series panelists