Course Descriptions

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A list of all Undergraduate courses in Ethnic Studies 
Prerequisite Grade

Any course listed in this department with a prerequisite assumes a grade of C– or better in the prerequisite course.

Lower Division

1 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
This introductory Ethnic Studies class draws upon interdisciplinary approaches to understand and problematize the study of race and ethnicity in the United States. The class will discuss current disciplinary debates, theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches within the diverse field of Ethnic Studies. By focusing upon diverse populations in the United States the class will index a broad range of cultural and political contexts; social problems; and histories to comprehend how racial formations and ethnic identity constructions have contradictorily served to: (1) create inequality and sustain systems of power and privilege and (2) create fissures of possibility to forge self-reflective solidarities and intercultural alliances that serve to dismantle oppressive conditions. The class will discuss the social construction of race and ethnicity coupled with the intersectionality of identity and positionality across race, class, gender and sexuality. Satisfies an Area C requirement in the pre-2012 general education requirements. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) requirement and The Common Good (TCG) requirement of the Core Curriculum.

50 Creating Community: Introduction to Skills for Building a Socially Just Society
Introduction to skills for leading and building a socially just society In a multicultural world, students will explore questions of leadership styles, facilitation, and community-building. Throughout the course, students will engage in three spheres of learning. First, they will learn to build a learning community with one another through required attendance and active participation in class activities, such as peer instruction of course materials, in-class writing assignments, role play skits, competitive games and debates, and interpersonal as well as intellectual dialogue. They will form groups for the community site placement, and those groups will provide support networks for one another throughout the semester in addition to working together on several major assignments, including the in-class facilitation, working in tandem on individual literature review papers, and working together on the final project for their community partners. Finally, they apply and synthesize what they learn in the classroom to the greater community for the common good through their community engagement service for local and campus community partners. There are no pre-requisites for this course.
This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) requirement and the Common Good (TCG) requirement of the Core Curriculum.

Upper Division

ES 100 (Special Topics)
Asian American History through Food

This introductory Ethnic Studies class draws upon interdisciplinary approaches to understand and problematize the study of race and ethnicity in the United States. The class will discuss current disciplinary debates, theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches within the diverse field of Ethnic Studies. By focusing upon diverse populations in the United States the class will index a broad range of cultural and political contexts; social problems; and histories to comprehend how racial formations and ethnic identity constructions have contradictorily served to: (1) create inequality and sustain systems of power and privilege and (2) create fissures of possibility to forge self-reflective solidarities and intercultural alliances that serve to dismantle oppressive conditions. The class will discuss the social construction of race and ethnicity coupled with the intersectionality of identity and positionality across race, class, gender and sexuality. Satisfies both American Diversity (AD) and Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) CORE requirements

Chicana/o Experiences
This class discusses Chicana/o experiences as situated in historical, political, social, and economic maps of meaning.  Central is how Chicana/o experiences intersect across social positions of race, class, gender, and sexuality.  Students will develop skills to interrogate and map “identity,” that has been constructed for and by Chicana/os across local and global contexts, socializing discourses and within the community and familial institutional settings.

101 Critical Race Theory
This course discusses Critical Race Theory (CRT) as an analytical framework that is used across the Social Sciences, Law and Education. Specifically, the course will engage CRT as an explanatory framework or set of basic perspectives, methods, and pedagogy that accounts for the role of race and racism across contexts (i.e., Education, Law, Policy, etc.) and social positions (gender, sexuality, religion, etc.)- and that works toward identifying and challenging racism within institutional contexts.
This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) requirement and the Common Good (TCG) requirement of the Core Curriculum.

102 Youth Cultures, Identities and New Ethnicities
This course is an introduction to the field of Critical Youth Studies that discuss the social constructions of youth culture and identity across time, space and social historical movements. The course focuses upon key concepts and theories of youth that intersect across social positions (i.e., race, gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity) in the U.S. Prerequisite: one of the following: ES 001, SOC 002, SOC 004, WAGS 001 or permission of instructor. 

196 Senior Thesis and Portfolio 
The course entails independent study, research and/or creative work in the area of ethnic studies. Though students are encouraged to employ a multidisciplinary approach, they need to choose a sponsor from among the faculty members on the Ethnic Studies Advisory Board. To be taken only after the completion ES 001 and two other upper-division electives in the minor.

195/197/199- Special Study

Cross-Listed Courses (Core designations in parenthesis. For more on CORE designations click here)

Anthropology:
131- Cultural Geography
Cultural geography studies the way people shape and give meaning to their environment, and allows us to look at the fascinating variety of human activity in the world — the human landscape. Geographic knowledge is vital to understanding national and international issues that dominate daily news reports. This course examines the relevance of geographic methods and concepts to such social science topics as agricultural patterns and practices, ethnic traditions and conflicts, gender, health, migration, political economy, poverty, religion, resource utilization, social change, and urban planning.
 

Communications:
106- Intercultural Communications
An exploration of intercultural communication within various national contexts, though primarily U.S.-based. The course will include an examination of the roles of identity, history, power, language, cultural values, nonverbal communication, migration, cultural space, popular cultural communication, and relationships. Students will also become familiar with intercultural communication theories and with approaches to studying intercultural communication. Seeks to provide a basis for comprehending the relationship between culture and communication and for understanding cultural practices, differences, and similarities. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) and Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) requirements of the Core Curriculum.

143 - Advanced Media Production I [Application] This is an upper-division course that delves into areas of specialization and advanced applications in media production. Possible topics may include web design, digital photography, motion graphics, video game design, animation, DVD authoring and advanced audio engineering. This course satisfies the Artistic Analysis (AA) and Creative Practice (CP) requirements of the Core Curriculum.

161- Communications & Social Justice
This course engages the power of communication as a transformative act. In the pursuit of social justice, communication can be a tool, a weapon and a witness on behalf of community service, social change and political struggle. The role of communication in relation to social justice is not just studied abstractly, but passionately practiced and embodied through real-world projects and first-hand experiences. This course involves a service learning component. Recent topics include food justice, hip hop, consumerism and drag culture.This course satisfies the Community Engagement (CE) and The Common Good (TCG) requirements of the Core Curriculum.

English:
152- 20th Century American Lit.
Study of American prose, poetry and fiction of the 20th century, with particular attention to the representation of cultural diversity. Readings may include writers representing modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Jazz Age and the Great Depression, the literary traditions of Chicano-, Hispanic-, and Asian-Americans.
154- Studies in African American Lit.
Study of some aspects of the African-American literary tradition. Examples of possible offerings are; Oral Tradition and Slave Narratives, African American Novelists, the Harlem Renaissance, Contemporary African American Poets. This course satisfies the Artistic Analysis (AA) and American Diversity (AD) requirements of the Core Curriculum.
182- The Drama 
Study of ancient, modern and contemporary forms of drama. May include film and television. Attention is given to plays as works designed for performance. Emphasis on the structure and forms of dramatic texts. This course satisfies the Artistic Analysis (AA) requirement of the Core Curriculum.
184-Contemporary Political Drama
Introduction to current plays by American and British playwrights. Attention is given to plays as works designed for theatrical production. This course satisfies the Artistic Analysis (AA) requirement of the Core Curriculum.

History:
141- African American History
A survey of African American history from Reconstruction to the present with an emphasis on structural barriers to full equality, black migration, institution building, the enduring struggle for economic, political, and social equality, and the transnational dimensions of the black freedom struggle. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) and Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) requirements of the Core Curriculum.
142- History of California
Students must have sophomore standing to enroll in upper-division courses.
A chronological survey of California history from its pre-contact beginnings to the present, with an emphasis on ethnic diversity, national and transnational interactions, environmental problems, social movements, competing visions of the “California dream,” and contestations over the allocation of economic, social, and political power. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) and Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) requirements of the Core Curriculum.

Performing Arts:
113- Jazz & Blues in America 
An examination of the development of jazz and blues in the United States from 19th-century precursors to the present. Major artists and trends are studied through directed listening and analysis of the cultural context from which they arose.
184- Dance in Performance
This course examines dance from a critical and intersectional perspective through the lenses of power and privilege, using the medium to explore race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, ability, age, etc. The class attends dance concerts around the Bay Area; the concerts are selected to engage with a variety of dance styles, venues, and ideas and the class dialogue about them is at the central work of the course. This course is writing intensive. This class is a requirement for all Dance majors and minors and Music and Theatre majors. This course satisfies the Artistic Performance (AA), American Diversity (AD), and Writing in the Discipline (WID) of the Core Curriculum.

Politics:
106- Politics of Labor
A study of the American labor movement from its early economic militancy through its later political passivity to its renewed vigor amidst unprecedented attack in the present time. Topics include de-industrialization and the transformation of work, the changing gender, ethnic and racial composition of the workforce, the plight of immigrants and undocumented workers, and how the employer offensive and labor laws affect unionization. A special feature of this course is a series of speakers from the Labor Movement who address the issues they face.
110- Race in U.S. Politics
An examination of the racial and ethnic dimensions of American politics. Topics include the growing diversity of the American population; government policies on civil rights, affirmative action and immigration; political participation by, and political conflicts among, racial and ethnic groups; and the impact of ethnic and racial subcultures on contemporary politics. Includes Community-Based Research (the equivalent of a lab) (.25 credit). This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD), Community Engagement (CE), and The Common Good (TCG) requirements of the Core Curriculum.
115- Theories of Justice 
The course examines different theories of justice based on concepts such as “fairness,” “equal treatment,” and “getting one’s due.” These alternative theories are then applied to contemporary controversies concerning economic, racial, sexual and environmental justice and to current debates about such issues as immigration, euthanasia, abortion, and capital punishment. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD), Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) and The Common Good (TCG) requirements of the Core Curriculum.
140- Gender Politics
A study of the social, economic, political and legal status of women in contemporary America and in other countries. The course examines the dynamic changes taking place in the relationship between women and men. Topics include the history of women’s liberation movements, contemporary battles on workplace equality, parental leave, equal pay, reproductive justice, etc. Includes Community-Based Research (the equivalent of a lab). (.25 credit).This course satisfies the Community Engagement (CE) requirement of the Core Curriculum.

Psychology:
163- Prejudice & Stereotyping
Prerequisites-PSYCH 001 and any one of the following: PSYCH 003PSYCH 160 or ES 001.
An investigation of theories of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination. Students will explore how stigmatized individuals are impacted by prejudice in American society. Methods to reduce prejudice will be considered, and the inevitability of prejudice will be addressed. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) requirement of the Core Curriculum.

Seminar:
144-Multicultural Thought
This class deals directly with multicultural texts written by 20th-century authors who grapple with intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality across disparate contexts. In Seminar the instructor does not take the role of expert or authority figure with all the answers. Instead, the class as a whole reads the text carefully outside of class and comes to class prepared to discuss, question and interpret the text. Through shared inquiry students will identify important passages to offer multiple interpretations; challenge competing ideas and question disparate and individual perspectives. Respectful listening and participation are central to class discussion.

Sociology:
Prerequisites: All upper-division courses have a prerequisite of SOC 002, or SOC 004, or the consent of the instructor.
107- Whiteness
There is an underlying assumption to society’s understanding of race and race relations that only minorities or people of color have a racial identity; and that whites are the “norm”, the referent, the 4 majorities, and the mainstream, not members of a racial group. In this course, we will investigate the sociohistorical and cultural constructions of race through an exploration of whiteness. We will examine whiteness in relation to race, class, ethnicity and gender. Is “white” a “race”? How did “white” become a racial category? What is whiteness? What is white privilege? This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) requirement of the Core Curriculum. 
111- Sociology of Families
Families are one of our most basic social institutions. They provide the primary social and physical contexts within which we become fully human. This course begins by exploring the idea of “the traditional family” and continues by examining historical trends and empirical data about American family life over the past century; including divorce patterns, fertility rates, women entering the workforce, and marriage. The class focuses on diversity and change, particularly the ways that social trends and social categories influence family structures. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD), and Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) requirements of the Core Curriculum.
115- Wealth & Poverty in the U.S.
This course offers an in-depth study of wealth, poverty, and the economic system in which they are grounded in the United States. Toward this end, students will apply various theoretical frameworks on economic inequality to current social problems in order to evaluate each framework’s explanatory power. Further, students will critique past and current programs for lessening the impacts of poverty and use this knowledge to imagine and critique possible future policies.This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD), and Social, Historical, Cultural Understanding (SHCU) requirements of the Core Curriculum.
123- Ethnic Groups in the U.S.
Each course in this series looks at one of the following American ethnic groups: Latinos, Asian Americans, African Americans. While emphasizing the contemporary period, each course focuses on the social, cultural and historical experiences of each group. Areas covered are assimilation and resistance, distribution in the social and power structure, family systems and cultural values, labor and migration, role of religion, status of women, etc. May be repeated for credit as content varies. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD) requirement of the Core Curriculum.
125- Gender & Society
While sex differences are biological, gender encompasses the traits that society assigns to and inculcates in males and females. This course studies the latter: the interplay between gender and society. It takes an inclusive perspective, with a focus on men and women in different cultural contexts defined by ethnic group membership, sexuality and socioeconomic status.

Theology & Religious Studies:
117- Wealth & Poverty in the Bible
This course explores biblical and theological perspectives and values on wealth, poverty, and economic justice, paying particular attention to potential implications those issues may have for the contemporary Christian community and wider society. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD), The Common Good (TCG) and the Theological Explorations (TE), requirements of the Core Curriculum.
171- Gender & Religion in America
This course focuses on the relationship between gender and religion in North American history and culture. We will explore gender as a category of analysis for the study of religion, and the ways that religions construct and deconstruct gender norms. Religion is lived and practiced, and therefore it cannot be separated from the gendered bodies that people inhabit. We will use historical and contemporary case studies to examine the way that notions of femininity and masculinity have played a role in the religious lives of Americans. This course satisfies the American Diversity (AD), and Theological Explorations (TE) requirements of the Core Curriculum.