Marco Aponte-Moreno, Ph.D.

An assistant professor of Global Business at the School of Economics and Business Administration, Aponte-Moreno's research focuses on leadership and cross-cultural management.

Dr Aponte-Moreno is an Assistant Professor of Global Business. His research focuses on leadership and crosscultural management.

Professor Marco Aponte-Moreno has written extensively about political leadership in Venezuela, his native country. His academic research includes examinging how world leaders use linguistic elements and artistic techniques in their efforts to inspire followers across cultures. His doctoral dissertation analyzed the leadership discourse of former Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez over a period of nine years.

Aponte-Moreno is also a Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy and an active member of the International Leadership Association. His coursework at Saint Mary's includes managing global competition, managing global firms and global business.

Prior to working in academia, Dr Aponte-Moreno worked in international banking for many years, specializing in corporate finance in emerging markets (Latin America). In New York, he worked for Crédit Lyonnais, ED&F Mann, and Mizuho Corporate Bank. In Miami, he worked for Banque Sudameris.

His insights have appeared in numerous international media outlets, including the BBC, The Guardian, The World Policy Journal, and the International Policy Digest.

Professor Aponte-Moreno can be reached by email at or on his mobile phone at (510) 542-7400.

His press articles include:

  • Beyond Brexit, the world’s still turning: global stories you might have missed. The Conversation (June 29, 2016).
  • Venezuela amps up media repression by sentencing newspaper editor to prison. The Conversation (with L. Lattig, March 31, 2016).
  • 2015: the year in elections. The Conversation (January 1, 2016).
  • Venezuela’s government faces a lose-lose election, but will it ever accept defeat. The Conversation (with L. Lattig, December 3, 2015).
  • Brazil and Venezuela’s unpopular leaders remain friends, for now. The Conversation (with L. Lattig, June 24, 2015. Portuguese version in Folha de Sao Paulo, July 5, 2015).
  • The jailed opposition leader who might hold the key to Venezuela’s future. The Conversation (with L. Lattig, May 26, 2015).
  • As crisis in Venezuela deepens, Maduro’s iron fist tightens. International Policy Digest (with L. Lattig, March 5, 2015).
  • After Chávez. The Times Higher Education (October 16, 2014)
  • The World’s Best Leaders Are Cast as Themselves in a Play That Never Ends. The Guardian. (August 15, 2014).

Expert opinions:

  •, December 5, 2016. "Tintori chains herself in the Vatican for freedom in Venezuela" (Published in Spanish: Tintori se encadena en el Vaticano por libertad en Venezuela.
  • El Colombiano, July 28, 2016. “Obstacles to the referendum against Maduro exasperate a fed-up opposition (Published in Spanish: Trabas al referendo contra Maduro exaperan a una oposición hasteada).
  • El Colombiano, June 22, 2016.“Organization of American States maintains its position regarding Venezuela” (Published in Spanish: OEA sigue firme ante Venezuela). 
  • Australian News (, May 24, 2016. “Experts fear Venezuela on the brink of military coup following country’s largest ever ‘war games’”.
  • BBC Radio 4, March 10, 2013. Radio interview for the Last Word program on Hugo Chávez’s death.