Working in the U.S.

Never work without proper authorization!

International and exchange students have three options for working in the United States.  Before beginning work in the U.S., contact the Center for International Programs to discuss these options and to get the proper authorization to allow you to legally work in the U.S.

Working On Campus

Both F-1 and J-1 students are immediately eligible to work on campus!  J-1 students MUST have work authorization before beginning work on campus.  Once you receive an offer letter for your on-campus job, please stop by the Center for International Programs to tell us about your employment and to get help with applying for a Social Security Number. 

Important information to keep in mind when considering getting an on-campus job:

  • F-1 and J-1 students can work a maximum of 20 hours per week while classes are in session, but can go full-time during breaks
  • You need a Social Security Number in order to be paid
  • It is your responsibility to communicate the restrictions of your on-campus employment to your manager
  • J-1 students MUST have work authorization before beginning on-campus work
  • Open positions can be found on Handshake

Volunteering

It's the Lasallian way!  All F-1 and J-1 students can volunteer with non-profit organizations that have established volunteer programs.  Students can volunteer with religious, charitable or humanitarian organizations on a part-time basis.  For example, you can volunteer at a local homeless or animal shelter, you can participate in costal clean up days, or you can work with the local church.  Before participating in a volunteer experience, contact the Center for International Programs to discuss the opportunity and verify that you are authorized to being volunteering.

To determine if the work you are doing is truly volunteer, ask yourself these questions:

  • Who is benefitting from the work that I am doing?  The organization or the general public?
    • If the organization is the main beneficiary, then it is not a true volunteer position.
  • Am I the only volunteer in the organization?
    • This can be considered an unpaid internship, which would require work authorization.
  • Would this work normally be done by a paid employee?
    • Again, this can be considered an unpaid internship, which would require work authorization.
  • Has this organization offered me a job?
    • You definitely need work authorization before beginning work.