June Term 2020

Jan Term is excited to offer 2 upper-division online courses for June 2020!

On-Campus

JAN 100-01 Energy Sustainability with Alexandra LaGatta

JAN 101-01 The Science of Cooking with Jay Chugh

 

Travel

Unfortunately, JAN 170 to Australia has been canceled due to the Covid-19 stay-at-home order. 

 

 

JAN 100-01 Energy Sustainability

Instructor: Alexandra LaGatta, abl4@stmarys-ca.edu

This course will be given online due to the stay-at-home orders.  

Meets: MThThF   12:00 PM - 2:35 PM

Course Fee: $0 (The original fee has been reversed)

Pre-Requisites:  MATH 14 or 27, or by Permission of Instructor

Description: 

World population is growing exponentially. Energy consumption is expected to grow 50% by 2050. How do we meet this demand in the face of global warming, air pollution and environmental destruction? This course investigates our current energy supplies, and the infrastructure built on fossil fuels. Students become intimately familiar with the production of electricity and the incredible amount of work (and waste) that goes into flipping on a light switch.

We delve into the repercussions of burning fossil fuels. Increased carbon dioxide concentrations are correlated with increased global temperatures, more erratic weather patterns, decline in ice sheets, and rising seas. Solar, wind, and micro-hydro offer promising alternatives, but are they enough? How do we cover our baseload when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing? How do we fuel the transportation sector without oil?

Students will quantitatively assess our various energy options. Embracing efficiency and reducing our consumption are paramount. Not using a gallon of gasoline is better in every possible way than seeking out an energy alternative. Students will visit a state-of-the-art natural gas fired power plant. They will spend approximately 20 hours outside of class engaging with the community, working, doing research, and conducting interviews. These efforts will help steer the college towards more sustainable operations and fulfill their CE Core requirement. Students will compose and articulate weekly reflections on how their understanding and perspectives have progressed. Armed with experience and information, they will slowly and deliberately piece together what the future of energy must look like if the human race is going to continue thriving.

 

Reading List:

  • Energy: its Use and Environment, Hinrichs and Kleinbach, 5th Ed. 
  • Climate Change Performance Index, Results 2019 
  • Global Warming's New Math, Bill McKibben 
  • Peer-reviewed articles by Dan Kammen, Richard Muller, Ted Nordhaus

 

Basis for Final Grade:

  • 40%  Exam                                    
  • 30%  Lab/HW/Field Trip                   
  • 25%  Final Project/CE Reflection                               
  •   5%  Participation, Professionalism     

 

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand all things electricity and modern-day energy supply
  • Have a basic understanding of climate change and what is causing it
  • Be familiar with your own carbon footprint
  • Understand and be able to size a photovoltaic system
  • The different challenges faced by developed versus developing nations in tackling climate change
  • Why energy efficiency is paramount
  • Articulating how your community engagement experience enhanced or altered your perspective.
  • Integrate the principles of sustainable living as you embark on your life journey

 

 

 

JAN 101-01 The Science of Cooking

Instructor: Jay Chugh, nchugh@stmarys-ca.edu

This course will be given online due to the stay-at-home orders.  

Meets: TuWTh 10 AM - 2 PM

Course Fee: $0 (The original fee has been reversed)

Pre-Requisites:  none

Description: 

Cooking represents one of the earliest forms of scientific inquiry. Through curious observation, followed
by careful and repeated experimentation, our recipes have evolved over hundreds of years. But what is the science behind cooking? What molecular changes drive culinary successes (or failures)?

In this course, we will reflect on past culinary traditions and critically evaluate the ethical, legal,
biological, and political ramifications of current agricultural transformations. We then learn about the
science of cooking and apply it while we design and create our own meals through inquiry-driven, hands-on
experimentation. We will capitalize on our interdisciplinary understanding of culinary science to shape
a new vision of cooking and eating, thereby strengthening our present and future roles as nurturing family
members, responsible community members, thoughtful consumers, and productive citizens.
All students who harbor a genuine enthusiasm for the science of cooking are welcome. A basic understanding of cooking practices is recommended.

Reading List: 

  • Harold McGee, "On Food and Cooking"
  • Cooks Illustrated, "The Science of Good Cooking"
  • Kenji Alt-Lopez, "The Food Lab"
  • Michael Pollan, "Omnivore's Dilemma"

Basis for Final Grade:

  • 20% Quality of active daily participation
  • 20% lab notebook
  • 20% recipe journal
  • 20% research paper (8-10 pages)
  • 20% final exam

Learning Outcomes:

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to
  • Apply the scientific method to everyday situations, especially to food preparations
  • Describe the specific chemical processes that occur during cooking and eating
  • Contrast past and present culinary and farming traditions
  • Critically evaluate the ethical, legal, biological, and political ramifications of agricultural transformations as informed, responsible, and productive citizens, future leaders, and budding gourmands