Our faculty have discovered new species, explored the intersection between science and art, and done pioneering work in the use of digital technology.  Click here for a list of recent faculty publications.

Keith Ogawa (Under Construction)  |  Interests  |  Scholarship  |  Service  

Education:

  • Ph. D. Psychology, UC Davis, 1992
  • M.A. Psychology, San Jose State University, 1983
  • B.A. Psychology, San Jose State University, 1981

Teaching Experience:

  • Professor - Saint Mary's College of California (2004)
  • Associate Professor - Saint Mary's College of California (1999 - 2003)
  • Assistant Professor - Saint Mary's College of California (1995 - 1999)
  • Lecturer - UC Davis (1993 - 1994)
  • Instructor - UC Davis (1992 - 1993)
  • Associate Instructor - UC Davis (1990 - 1991)

Research Experience:

  • Research Associate - Dept. of Neurology, UC Davis (1994 - 1995)
  • Postdoc - Dept. of Neurology, UC Davis (1992 - 1994)

Award:


  • Military Honors, Letters of Commendation

Professional Licenses & Certifications:

  • D.A.C.F.E. - American College of Forensic Examiners (1996)

Publications:

  • 2014. Immediate effects of deep brain stimulation of anterior thalamic nuclei on executive functions and emotion-attention interaction in humans., Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 26, issue 5, pg.540-550
  • 2014. Low attentional engagement makes attention network activity susceptible to emotional interference., NeuroReport, vol. 25, pg.1038-1043
  • 2013. Emotional modulation of attention networks depends on task engagement., Society for Neuroscience Proceedings, pg.129
  • 2013. Immediate effects of anterior thalamic stimulation on human cognition and emotion., Society for Neuroscience Proceedings, pg.63
  • 2012. Orbitofrontal cortex biases attention to emotional events., Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 34, issue 6, pg.588-597
  • 2012. Threat interferes with response inhibition., NeuroReport, vol. 23, issue 7, pg.447-450
  • 2010. Persistent symptoms in mild to moderate traumatic brain injury associated with executive dysfunction., Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 32, issue 7, pg.767-774
  • 2010. Trees over forest: Unpleasant stimuli compete for attention with global features., NeruoReport, vol. 21, issue 5, pg.344-348
  • 2007. Emotionally arousing stimuli compete with attention to left hemispace., NeuroReport, vol. 18, issue 18, pg.1929-1933
  • 2003. Forrest or trees? Effect of emotions on global and local processing., Cognitive Neuroscience Proceedings, vol. 10, pg.201
  • 2002. Affective interference of right hemisphere dependent global processing., Society for Neuroscience Proceedings, issue 28, pg.780.11
  • 2001. Asymmetric organization of human prefrontal cortex for emotional processing., Society for Neuroscience Proceedings, vol. 27, pg.645.9
  • 2001. Orbital-thalamic network for the regulation of cortical synchronization., Cognitive Neuroscience Proceedings, pg.77
  • 2001. Location and frequency cues in auditory selective attention., Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Psychophysics, vol. 27, issue 1, pg.65-74
  • 2000. Transient interference of right hemispheric function due to automatic emotional processing., Neuropsychologia, vol. 38, pg.1576-1580
  • 2000. Effects of emotional stimuli on event-related potentials and reaction time in orbitofrontal patients., Brain and Cognition, vol. 47, pg.339-341
  • 2000. Event-related potentials and reaction times reflect differential effects of emotional stimulation., Cognitive Neuroscience Society Proceedings, pg.55
  • 2000. Altered emotional influence on visual attention subsequent to orbitofrontal damage in humans., Society for Neuroscience Proceedings, vol. 26, issue 2, pg.2023
  • 1999. Automatic processing of emotional stimuli impairs right hemispheric function., Society for Neuroscience, vol. 25, issue 2, pg.2146
  • 1998. Conjoining auditory and visual features during high-rate serial presentation: Processing and conjoining two features can be faster than processing one., Perception and Psychophysics, vol. 60, issue 2, pg.239-249
  • 1998. Parallel stimulus processing in a dyadic search task., Cognitive Neuroscience Society, vol. 5, pg.140
  • 1998. Electrophysiological studies of dyadic search., Society for Neuroscience, vol. 24, issue 2, pg.380
  • 1995. The effects of dorsolateral prefrontal lesions on visual search., Society for Neuroscience, vol. 21, issue 2, pg.937
  • 1994. Brain indices of automatic pattern detection., NeuroReport, vol. 6, pg.140-144
  • 1994. Visual search in complex displays., American Psychological Society Proceedings, vol. 45
  • 1993. Auditory feature conjunction: Primacy of frequency over lateralization cues., Society for Neuroscience, vol. 19, issue 3, pg.1805
  • 1989. Causal primacy and comparative fault: The effect of position in a causal chain on judgments of legal responsibility., Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 15, issue 2, pg.161-174
  • 1989. Significance of light and social cues in the maintenance of temporal organization in man., The Physiologist, vol. 32, issue 11, pg.94-95
  • 1988. Eyewitness memory and the importance of sequential information., Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, vol. 26, issue 5, pg.395-398
  • 1988. Retrieval of the irretrievable: The effect of sequential information on response bias., Practical aspects of memory: Current research and issues, vol. 1, pg.490-495
  • Ogawa (Under Construction), Keith. 1985. Physiological and psychological evaluation of human triads exposed to 105 days of social isolation and confinement., NASA
  • 1983. Does social interaction influence sleep-wake activity during small group confinement in a constant environment?, The Physiologist, vol. 26, pg.A78
  • 1982. REM deprivation effects on testosterone levels in male rats., Sleep Research, vol. 11, pg.194
  • . Aging and auditory stream segregation., Journal of Gerontology: Psychology, vol. 51, pg.91-93
Maps & Directories

Mailing Address

Saint Mary's College of California
1928 Saint Mary's Road
Moraga, CA 94575
(925) 631-4000
Google Map | Campus Map | PO Boxes